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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

United States government and military contingency plans are derived from a complex 
hierarchy of guidance originating with the President, the National Security Council, and 
responsible national security cabinet secretaries and other civilian officials. The 
President's National Security Strategy (and other national strategy documents) sets 
overall strategy, supplemented by often highly classified Presidential directives that 
establish foreign policy relations and objectives. Homeland security Presidential 
directives, created since 9/11, determine interagency policies regarding domestic security. 

Contingency planning of the United States government covers a wide variety of day-to- 
day and potential future scenarios, from protection of the President and continuity of 
government at the highest levels to dealing with natural disasters at the lowest levels. 
"Deliberate" plans for nuclear and conventional war are prepared and kept up to date for 
select countries (e.g., North Korea, Iran, nuclear attack by Russia or China) and generic 
contingencies (e.g., destruction of foreign weapons of mass destruction facilities). In a 
crisis or in the case of an unplanned contingency, plans can be prepared from general 
templates or even from "no plan" situations. 

Most of the details of contingency planning is highly classified; even the existence of 
most plans is kept secret. Many contingency plans have unclassified code names 
associated with them (e.g., "Power Geyser," the federal continuity of government plan), 
but the details of the planning and the various options within plans are highly protected. 

Military Contingency Plans 

Within the military, the Secretary of Defense determines the National Military Strategy 
(NMS) and provides the Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) with the Strategic/Joint Planning 
Guidance (S/JPG) and the Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) for the preparation of 
military strategy and operations plans at the JCS and command level. The JCS writes the 
biennial Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP) which forms the basic guidance for 
unified commands. Based upon the CPG, the JSCP requires a certain number of 
contingency plans to be produced and kept current. 

During the tenure of Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara, the JCS standardized 
procedures for contingency planning, leading to the creation of the Joint Operation 
Planning System (today the Joint Operations Planning and Execution System or JOPES). 
JOPS established policies for developing, coordinating, disseminating, reviewing and 
approving plans for conducting military operations, both for "deliberate" planning and 
crisis action planning. 

In 2003-2004, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld directed a number of changes to 
the Cold War deliberate process originally established in the McNamara era. An 
"adaptive" planning process was introduced to replace the two year highly structured plan 
development and review process. Modern communications, information and planning 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Finns, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

tools would allow the rapid development of new strategic guidance on emerging 
problems, and allow commanders, the Joint Staff and the office of the Secretary of 
Defense the ability to review assumptions and courses of action and the plan itself. With 
the end of the Cold War and the advent of 9/1 1, the focus of contingency planning 
became far more regional then global. Secretary of Defense Strategic Guidance 
Statements (SGS) were introduced to supplement the CPG and start the planning 
sequence during peacetime. 

Today, there are five basic types of plans: 

• Campaign Plan (CAMPLAN): A plan for a series of related military operations 
aimed at accomplishing a strategic or operational objective within a given time 
and space (e.g., campaign plan for Iraq incorporating a number of subordinate 
specific plans). 

• Operations Plan (OPLAN): A completed plan required when there is compelling 
national interest, when a specific threat exists, and/or when the nature of the 
contingency requires detailed planning (e.g., North Korea). OPLANs contains all 
formatted annexes (see below), and Time Phased Force and Deployment Data 
(TPFDD), a database containing units to be deployed, routing of deploying units, 
movement data of forces, personnel, logistics and transportation requirements. 
An OPLAN can be used as a basis for development of an Operations Order 
(OPORD). 

• Operations Plan in Concept Form Only (CONPLAN): An operations plan in an 
abbreviated format prepared for less compelling national interest contingencies 
than for OPLANs and for unspecific threats. A CONPLAN requires expansion or 
alteration to convert into an OPLAN or OPORD. It normally includes a statement 
of Strategic Concept and annexes A-D and K (see below). CONPLANs that do 
have TPFDDs are usually developed because of international agreement or 
treaties. 

• Functional plans (FUNCPLAN): An operations plan involving the conduct of 
military operations in a peacetime or non-hostile environment (e.g., disaster relief, 
humanitarian assistance, counter-drug, or peacekeeping operations). 

• Theater Security Cooperation and Theater Engagement Plans (TSCPs and TEPs): 
Day-to-day plans to set the initial conditions for future military action in terms of 
multinational capabilities, U.S. military access, coalition interoperability, and 
intelligence sharing. 

The draft Secretary of Defense Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) for 2003 
mandated 1 1 prioritized families of plans at four levels of detail. The FY 2002 JSCP 
tasked the combatant commanders to develop a total of 64 Plans. 1 These include: 



Four additional plans belong to the JCS, one of which has been assigned to NORTHCOM since 2003. 
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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• OPLANS: 6 (two for CENTCOM, two for PACOM, one for NORTHCOM, and 
one for STRATCOM) 

• CONPLANS: 47 

• FUNCPLANS:11 

Most military contingency plans are identified by a plan identification number (PID), a 
command unique four-digit number followed by a suffix indicating the JSCP year for 
which the plan was written (i.e., 2220-02). 2 The 4-digit number in the PID does not 
change when the OPLAN/CONPLAN is revised or converted into an OPORD not is it 
reused when the requirement for the plan is canceled. The 2-digit number does not 
change when a plan is revised in part or approved for a subsequent period of the JSCP, 
however, the calendar year or fiscal year of the JSCP to which the change or related 
document applies will be referenced. Supporting plans by subordinate commands are 
assigned a PID identical to that of the supported plan. 

PID NUMBER Command 

0001 - 0999 JCS 

1000 - 1999 CENTCOM 

2000 - 2999 JFCOM/NORTHCOM 

3000 - 3399 NORAD 

3400 - 3999 NORTHCOM (formerly SPACECOM plans) 

4000 - 4999 EUCOM 

5000 - 5999 PACOM 

6000 - 6999 SOUTHCOM 

7000 - 7999 SOCOM (7000 through 7499 formerly FORSCOM plans) 

8000 - 8999 STRATCOM 

9000 - 9599 TRANSCOM 

9600 - 9699 Reserved 

9700 - 9999 Coast Guard 

The basic operations plan is usually brief, with detailed guidance spelled out in formatted 
Annexes and appendices. The JOPES specifies the annex and appendix structure for each 
plans. Appendixes are attached to appropriate annexes to narrow details required for a 
plan. 

Standard Operations Plan Annexes 



In the JCS Joint Operation Planning and Execution System (JOPES) data base, the PID is expressed as a 
five-digit number representing the command-unique four digit identifier, followed by a one-character, 
alphabetic suffix indicating the OPLAN option, or a one-digit number whose numeric value indicates the 
JSCP year for which the plan is written. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

A Task Organization 

B Intelligence 

C Operations 

D Logistics 

E Personnel 

F Public Affairs 

G Civil Affairs 

H Meteorological and Oceanographic Operations 

J Command Relationships 

K Command, Control, Communications and Computer Systems 

L Environmental Considerations 

M Geospatial Information and Services 

N Space Operations 

P Host Nation Support 

Q Medical Services 

R Reports 

S Special Technical Operations 

T Consequence Management 

V Interagency Coordination 

X Execution Checklist 3 

Z Distribution 



3 Annex X is considered one of the most critical as it provides checklists that can be used in the event the 
plan is activated. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

National Strategies 

National Security Strategy of the US, September 2002 

Replaced National Security Strategy for a Global Age, 2000 

National Strategy for Homeland Security, July 2002 

National Strategy for Combating Terrorism, February 2003 

National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction, December 2002 

National Money Laundering Strategy, July 2002 

National Drug Control Strategy, February 2002 

National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace, February 2003 

National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructure and Key 
Assets, February 2003 

Presidential Emergency Action Documents (PEADs) 

Little is known about the highly classified PEADs, which are believed to constitute the 
highest level contingency planning for the White House and the federal government, and 
constitute pre-planned Presidential declarations. PEADs are believed to mostly relate to 
the Continuity of Government (COG) program and the execution of martial law and other 
sensitive and secretive operations. They are numbered and approved by the President. 
PEAD 6 reportedly once provided for the arrest and detention of U.S. citizens as well as 
aliens considered dangerous to the national defense and public safety, as well as for the 
seizure of property for which there is a reason to believe may be used to the detriment of 
national defense and public safety. PEAD 22 was approved in the Reagan 
Administration. 

Presidential Directives 

National Security Presidential Directives (NSPDs), signed by the President, serve as the 
primary instrument for communicating presidential decisions about the national security 
policies of the United States. 4 Many Presidential directives apply across multiple 



4 Organization of the National Security Council System, National Security Presidential Directive- 1, 13 
February 2001. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

administrations. Some of the more important relating to the war on terrorism and 
contingency planning: 

US Policy on Counterterrorism, PDD/NSC-39, 21 June 1995 

Validates and reaffirms the Department of Justure, acting through the FBI, as the 
overall lead federal agency (LFA) and lead agency for crisis management and FEMA 
as the domestic lead agency for consequence management (CM). 5 

The Domestic Guidelines are a classified document addressing the guidelines for the 
mobilization, deployment, and employment of USG agencies in response to a 
domestic threat or terrorist incident. The PDD-39 Domestic Guidelines assigns 
specific responsibilities to DOJ, FBI, DOD, FEMA, DOE, EPA, and HHS. These 
guidelines are designed to facilitate and enhance USG interagency coordination to 
effectively respond to potential or actual domestic terrorism. As the overall LFA for 
response to threats or acts of terrorism inside the United States, DOJ, acting through 
the FBI, is supported by FEMA and other federal agencies. The FBI is the lead 
agency for formulating and executing a crisis management response. FEMA is the 
lead agency for formulating and executing a Federal CM response in support of state 
and local governments 

Protection Against Unconventional Threats to the Homeland and Americans 
Overseas, PDD/NSC-62, 22 May 1998 

Reaffirms the domestic lead agencies and their responsibilities. Additionally, it 
outlines the roles and responsibilities of other federal agencies, including Public 
Health Service (PHS) (health/medical), EPA (HAZMAT/environmental) and DOE 
(radiological). PDD-62 identifies lead agency responsibilities with regard to an 
NSSE. The FBI is the lead agency for crisis management, intelligence, and federal 
criminal investigation. The USSS is the lead agency for security design/planning and 
implementation. FEMA is the lead agency for CM. Other departments, such as 
Defense, State, Energy, Health and Human Services, Transportation, and the EPA, 
may provide specialized resources in support of these crisis management, security, 
and CM efforts. 

Ensuring Constitutional Government and Continuity of Government Operations, 

PDD/NSC-67, 21 October 1998, Top Secret 



Department of Justice, "Guidelines for the Mobilization, Deployment, and Employment of U.S. 
Government Agencies in Response to a Domestic Threat or Incident of Terrorism in Accordance with 
Presidential Decision Directive 39," 8 August 2000. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Replaced National Security Directive (NSD) 69, "Enduring Constitutional 
Government" 2 June 1992; NSD 37, "Enduring Constitutional Government" 18 April 
1990; National Security Decision Directives (NSDD) 55, "Enduring National 
Leadership," 14 September 1982; National Security Decision Directives (NSDD) 47 
"Emergency Mobilization Preparedness," 22 July 1982; Presidential Directive (PD) 
58, "Continuity of Government," 30 June 1980; National Security Decision 
Memoranda (NSDM) 201, "Contingency Planning," 5 January 1973; National 
Security Decision Memoranda (NSDM) 8, "Crisis Anticipation and Management," 21 
March 1969; National Security Acton Memoranda (NSAM) 166, "Report on 
Emergency Plans and Continuity of the Government," 25 June 1962; National 
Security Acton Memoranda (NSAM) 127, "Emergency Planning for Continuity of 
Government," 14 February 1962; and NSC 5521, "NSC Relocation Plan," 1955 

Presidential Military Order, Detention, Treatment, and Trial of Certain Non-Citizens 
in the War Against Terrorism, 13 November 2001 

Homeland Security Presidential Directives 

Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPDs), signed by the President, "record and 
communicate presidential decisions about the homeland security policies of the United 
States." 6 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-l, Organization and Operation of 
the Homeland Security Council, 29 October 2001 

Established the Homeland Security Council (HSC) to ensure coordination of all 
homeland security-related activities among the executive departments and 
agencies and promote the effective development and implementation of all 
homeland security policies. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-2), Combating Terrorism Through 
Immigration Policies, 29 October 2001 

HSPD-2 established policies and procedures to prevent aliens who engage in or 
support terrorist activity from entering the US and to detain prosecute, or deport 
any such aliens who are within the US. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-3), The Homeland Security Advisory 
System, 1 1 March 2002 



6 Organization and Operation of the Homeland Security Council System, Homeland Security Presidential 
Directive- 1, 29 October 2001. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

HSPD-3 provides the guidelines for a comprehensive and effective means to 
disseminate information regarding the risk of terrorist acts to federal, state and 
local authorities and the American people. This document establishes the five 
threat conditions and their respective colors. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-4), National Strategy to Combat 
Weapons of Mass Destruction, December 2002 

HSPD-4 established 3 pillars for national strategy to combat WMD. They are: 
counter-proliferation to combat WMD use; strengthen nonproliferation to combat 
WMD proliferation; and consequence management to respond to WMD use. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-5), Management of Domestic 
Incidents, 28 February 2003: 

HSPD-5 identified steps for improved coordination in response to incidents. The 
directive describes the way federal departments and agencies will prepare for such 
responses, including prevention activities during the early stages of a terrorist 
incident. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-6), Integration and Use of Screening 
Information, 16 September 2003 

HSPD-6 provides for: the development and maintenance of accurate and current 
information about individuals known or appropriately suspected to be or have 
been engaged in conduct related to terrorism; and that information, as appropriate 
and permitted by law, can be used to support screening and protective processes. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-7), Critical Infrastructure 
Identification, Prioritization, and Protection, 17 December 2003 

HSPD-7 established a national policy for federal departments and agencies to 
identify and prioritize US critical infrastructure and key resources and to protect 
them from terrorist attacks. In that terrorist seek to destroy, incapacitate, or 
exploit critical infrastructure and key resources to threaten national security, mass 
casualties, weaken our economy, and damage public morale and confidence, such 
capabilities must be protected. Critical infrastructure and key resources provide 
the essential services that underpin American society. This directive identifies 
roles and responsibilities of the Secretary of Homeland Security and recognizes 
the DOD as the sector-specific agency for the defense industrial base. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-8), National Preparedness, 17 
December 2003 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



HSPD-8 established policies to strengthen the preparedness of the United States 
to prevent and respond to threats and actual domestic terrorist attacks, major 
disasters, and other emergencies by requiring a national domestic all-hazards 
preparedness goal, establishing mechanisms for improved delivery of federal 
preparedness assistance to state and local governments, and outlining actions to 
strengthen preparedness capabilities of federal, state, and local entities. 

Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD-9), Defense of United States 
Agriculture and Food, 30 January 2004 

HSPD-9 established a national policy to defend the agriculture and food system 
against terrorist attacks, major disasters, and other emergencies. 

Federal Emergency Plans 

Federal Emergency Plan C 

Basic mobilization plan for the United States, active in the Reagan administration but 
believed to be obsolete today. Replaced Federal Emergency Plan C, May 1959; 
replaced Mobilization Plan C, 1957. 

Federal Emergency Plan D ("Power Geyser"?) 

National communications and continuity of government in a "Plan D" situation, 
believed to still be the basic continuity of government (COG) plan for the United 
States government, perhaps under a different names. Includes Annex C-XI 
(Telecommunications), Federal Emergency Plan D (Classified) 

(The National Communications System Management Plan for Annex C-XI 
(Telecommunications) Federal Emergency Plan D (Classified)) 

Replaced FEMA OPLAN 6-84 and FEMA OPLAN 6-84D and Federal Emergency 
Plan D-Minus, June 1959 

Federal Emergency Plan Other that Plan D (OTD) 

Federal Government Plans 

Department of Health and Human Services, Health and Medical Services Support Plan 
for the Federal Response to Acts of Chemical/Biological (C/B) Terrorism, 21 June 
1996 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Department of Homeland Security, Initial National Response Plan, 30 September 2003 

HSPD-5 directed the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop and administer a 
NRP to integrate the current family of federal domestic prevention, preparedness, 
response and recovery plans into a single all-discipline, all-hazards plan in an attempt 
to unify domestic incident management. The FRP and the other family of emergency 
response plans (U.S. Government Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of 
Operations Plan, Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan, Mass Migration 
Emergency Plan, and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution 
Contingency Plan) will eventually be integrated into the NRP. However, at present, 
only an FNRP has been produced. While this document will serve as a bridge 
between the current family of documents and the NRP, the current family of response 
plans, including the FRP, remains in effect until a final NRP has been developed and 
approved. At that time, the NRP will supercede existing interagency plans, unless 
otherwise specified. In addition to consolidating federal plans, other modifications 
within the INRP that impact DOD are: the establishment of a Homeland Security 
Operations Center, the establishment of an interagency incident management group, 
and the creation of a Principal Federal Official who may be appointed to represent the 
Secretary of Homeland Security at the incident site. 

Annexes (Emergency Support Functions) 

ESF #1 - Transportation 

ESF #2 - Communications and Information Technology 

ESF #3 - Public Works and Engineering 

ESF #4 - Firefighting 

ESF #5 - Emergency Management 

ESF #6 - Mass care, Housing and Human Services 

ESF #7 - Resource Support and Logistics Management 

ESF #8 - Public Health and Medical Services 

ESF #9 - Urban Search and Rescue 

ESF #10 - Hazardous Materials Response 

ESF #11 -Agriculture 

ESF #12 -Energy 

ESF #13 - Public Safety and Security (Law Enforcement) 

ESF #14 - Economic Stabilization, Community Recovery and Mitigation 

ESF #15 - Emergency Public Information and External Communications 

Incident Annexes 

Biological 

Catastrophic Incident 
Cyber Response 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Food Security/Food Safety and Agriculture 

Nuclear/Radiological 

Oil and Hazardous Substances (Hazmat) 

Terrorism 

Department of Homeland Security (FEMA), Federal Response Plan - Interim, January 
2003. 

Implements the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act 
(9230.1 -PL), and establishes the basis for providing Federal assistance to affected 
States in the aftermath of natural disasters and most other domestic emergencies. The 
FRP consists of a Basic Plan, Emergency Support Function (ESF) Annexes, Recovery 
Function Annex, Support Annexes, Incident Annexes, Appendices and Figures. The 
12 ESF Annexes provide guidelines for federal support for emergency needs. The 
annexes include the federal scope and policies, a description of the emergency 
situation and its implications, a concept of operations, the roles and responsibilities of 
lead and support agencies, and a glossary of applicable terms. The Terrorism Incident 
Annex is the first in a series of anticipated incident annexes. Replaced April 1999 
and April 1992 plans. 

Terrorism Incident Annex to the Federal Response Plan, April 1999 

The Terrorism Annex was added to the FRP during the 1997 update to ensure that the 
FRP was adequate to respond to the consequences of terrorism within the US. The 
Terrorism Annex addresses potential CM requirements to crisis management 
operations, responsibilities of various Federal Agencies, and funding guidelines. 

HHS Health and Medical Services Support Plan for the Federal Response to Assets of 
Chemical/Biological Terrorism 

Department of Homeland Security (FEMA)/Department of Energy, Federal 
Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP), April 1996 

The FRERP establishes an organized and integrated capability for timely, coordinated 
response by federal agencies to peacetime radiological emergencies. The plan 
contains two sections; the first includes background, considerations, and scope, and 
the second describes the concept of operations for response. 

Supplement by Environmental Protection Agency, Radiological Emergency Response 
Plan, 10 January 2000 

Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Government 
Interagency Domestic Terrorism Concept of Operation Plan, FBI, January 2001 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



CONPLAN provides overall guidance to federal, state, and local agencies concerning 
how the federal government will respond to a potential or actual terrorist incident or 
threat that occurs in the United States, particularly one involving weapons of mass 
destruction (WMD). Replaced plan, 27 March 2000; replaced Weapons of Mass 
Destruction Incident Contingency Plan, 26 August 1998. 

Department of Justice, Mass Immigration Emergency Plan (MIEP) ("Operation 
Distant Shore"), 14 June 1995 

Replaced Immigration Emergency Plan ("Distant Shore"), 4 November 1993 
Interagency Contingency Communications Plan (ICCP), Secret 

Replaced the COOP Communications Plan (CCP) 

National Contingency Plan, 15 September 1994 

Organizational structure and procedures for preparing for and responding to 
discharges of oil and releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants 

National Search and Rescue Committee, United States National Search and Rescue 
Supplement to the International Aeronautical and Maritime Search and Rescue 
Manual, May 2000 

Security Control of Air Traffic and Air Navigation Aids (SCAT ANA) 

(DOT/DOD/FCC) 

Plan for Response to an Attack on or Threat Against a Nuclear Facility, Emergency 
Support Plan 

Federal Preparedness Circulars (FPC) 

FEMA, Martial Law?, FPC/FPE 6 

FEMA, Continuity of the Executive Branch of the Federal Government at the 
Headquarters Level During National Security Emergencies, FPC 60, 20 November 
1990 

FEMA, Emergency Succession to Key Positions of the Federal Departments and 
Agencies, FPC 61,2 August 1991. 

FEMA, Delegation of Authorities for Emergency Situations, FPC 62, 1 August 1991. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



FEMA, Federal Executive Branch Continuity of Operations (COOP), FPC 65, 15 

June 2004 

Supplements, replaces or provides guidance for the COG Annex to the Federal 
Response Plan. Replaced circular, 26 July 1999 and supersedes Test, Training and 
Exercise (TT&E) Program for Continuity of Operations (COOP), FPC 66, 30 April 
2001; and Acquisition of Alternate Facilities for Continuity of Operations (COOP), 
FPC 67, 30 April 2001. Replaced Continuity of Operations (COOP), Federal 
Response Planning Guidance 01-94, 4 December 1994 

CIA 

CIA Global War Plan 

Obsolete Cold War plan supplemented by the Military Support Annex for CIA Global 
War Plan, SM-842-6 1 , 27 July 1961 

Office of the Secretary of Defense 

National Defense Strategy, 2004 (Draft) 

New Secretary of Defense document that supports the National Security Strategy by 
establishing overarching defense objectives, linking military objectives to other 
government agencies, and identifying how the Department of Defense must work to 
secure access to key regions, lines of communications (LOCs), and the "Global 
Commons." The Defense Strategy levies four defense objectives: secure the United 
States from direct attack, secure strategic access and retain global freedom of action, 
establish security conditions conducive to a favorable international order, and 
strengthen alliances and partnerships to contend with common challenges. 

National Military Strategy (NMS) of the Department of Defense, Draft, 1 1 September 
2003. 

The biennial NMS report is due on 15 February every year under the FY 2004 
NDAA. The NMS provides military context for programming and planning in the 
Strategic Planning Guidance, Contingency Planning Guidance, and Security 
Cooperation Guidance. 

The NMS includes: 

- A description of the strategic environment. 

- A description of regional threats. 

- A description of transnational and non-state threats. 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

- Identification of national military objectives and their relationship to the strategic 
environment and threats. 

- Identification of the strategy, concepts, and elements that contribute to the 
achievement of the national military objectives. 

- An assessment of the capabilities and adequacy of US forces to execute the NMS. 

- An assessment of the capabilities, adequacy, and interoperability of regional allies 
to support US forces in combat and other operations. 

- An assessment of the resources, basing requirements, and support structure needed 
to achieve national military objectives. 

National Military Strategic Plan for the War on Terrorism, October 2002, Top Secret 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Civilian Oversight of DOD Combating Terrorism 
and Consequence Management Activities, 9 May 2001 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) 02, 28 

June 2002, Top Secret 

The CPG fulfills the statutory duty of the Secretary of Defense to furnish written 
policy guidance annually to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff for contingency 
planning. The Secretary issues this guidance with the approval of the President after 
consultation with the Chairman (the President signed the 2002 contingency guidance 
early in 2002). The CPG focuses the guidance given in the National Security 
Strategy and the Strategic/Joint Planning Guidance, and is the principal source 
document for preparation of the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP). The latest 
CPG institutionalizes the War on Terrorism in departmental strategic planning and 
implemented the 4-2-1 force sizing paradigm originally established in the 2001 
Quadrennial Defense Review (QDR). It also assigned DOD with protecting the 
homeland as its first priority. Deterrence in the future was also stated as continuing to 
depend heavily on the capability resident in the forward stationed and forward 
deployed combat and expeditionary forces. 

The draft Contingency Planning Guidance (CPG) for 2003 mandated 1 1 prioritized 
families of plans at four levels of detail, due to the Secretary of Defense by mid-2004. 
The CPG also provides guidance to the combatant commanders concerning 
contingencies and includes the Prioritized Regional Objectives for DOD. Combatant 
commanders use the Prioritized Regional Objectives to write their Theater 
Engagement Plan. Theater Engagement Planning addresses shaping the international 
environment to promote US interests. The Theater Engagement Plan has two parts. 
The first is the unified commander's Strategic Concept and the second is the Yearly 
Activity Annexes. 

Replaced CPG for Fiscal Years 1999-2003, January 1998; replaced CPG, 1997 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Defense Planning Guidance (DPG) 

In 2003, Secretary of Defense Rumsfeld reestablished biennial budgeting under 
direction contained in Management Initiative Decision (MID) 913. He directed Joint 
Defense Capabilities Study commissioned in March 2003, which separated the DPG 
into two documents, the Strategic Planning Guidance (SPG) and the Joint 
Programming Guidance (JPG). The final DPG was Defense Planning Guidance 
(DPG) 2004-2009, May 2002, Secret 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Forces for Unified Commands, Fiscal Year (FY 
2003), 2 October 2002 

The "Forces For" Memorandum supplements the Unified Command Plan (UCP). All 
forces (except as noted in title 10, US Code (USC), section 162 are assigned to 
combatant commands by the Secretary of Defense's Forces for Unified Commands 
memorandum. A force assigned or attached to a combatant command may be 
transferred from that command only as directed by the Secretary of Defense and 
under procedures prescribed by the Secretary of Defense and approved by the 
President. The command relationship the gaining commander will exercise (and the 
losing commander will relinquish) is specified by the Secretary of Defense. The FY 
2003 Forces For memorandum states that NORTHCOM must obtain approval from 
the SECDEF before assuming OPCON of forces assigned in the United States and its 
territories in any major emergency. 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Joint Programming Guidance (JPG), bi-annual 

Partially replaced the Defense Planning Guidance (DPG). The JPG is a Program 
Decision Memorandum (PDM) like document that captures SECDEF decisions 
resulting from a limited number of joint capability assessments completed during the 
Enhanced Planning Process in alternate years when the Strategic Planning Guidance 
(SPG) is not issued. The JPG and SPG provide the programming and fiscal guidance 
to the services for development of Program Objective Memorandums (POMs) for the 
defense planning period. 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Security Cooperation Guidance 

The Security Cooperation Guidance provides instruction on implementing defense 
strategy through regional partnerships. 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Strategic Guidance Statement (SGS) 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

The SGS supplements the Contingency Planning Guidance and is intended to provide 
detailed direction for strategy related to each "family" of plans. The publication 
timeline for each SGS is based on priority of the individual plans. 

• Draft Strategic Guidance Statement for Homeland Defense Planning, 1 

March 2004, Secret/REL to USA, AUS, CAN, NZ, UK 

Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Strategic Planning Guidance (SPG), Draft v3.0, 
January 2004, Secret (bi-annual) 

Partially replaced the Defense Planning Guidance (DPG). The Strategic Planning 
Guidance (SPG) communicates the Defense Strategy and the SECDEF's top resource 
priorities. It gives more specific programming guidance on where the Department 
will take and reduce risk for broad capability areas. The SPG lists the priorities of 
SECDEF: winning the Global War on Terrorism, strengthening combined/joint war 
fighting capabilities, transforming the joint force, optimizing intelligence capabilities, 
counter proliferation, improving force manning, developing and implementing new 
concepts for global engagement, strengthening our ability to fulfill responsibilities in 
HS, streamlining DOD processes, and reorganizing DOD and the US government to 
deal with pre-war opportunities and post war responsibilities. 

Defense Planning Scenario: Homeland Defense, 2010-2012, Draft, 12 August 
2003, Secret/NF 

Secretary of Defense Message (SECDEF message), Public Affairs Guidance -Counter- 
Terrorism/Special Mission Units, 21 1644Z April 99 (21 April 1999) 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum (U05646-03), Collecting, Reporting, and 
Analysis of Terrorist Threats to DoD Within The United States, 2 May 2003 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Department Support to Domestic Law 
Enforcement Agencies Performing Counterdrug Activities, 2 October 2003 

Emphasizes use of title 32 (National Guard) vs. title 10 (Active duty and Reserve) 
personnel for domestic CD missions/activities. 

Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum, Department of Defense International 
Counternarcotics Policy, 3 October 2003 

Emphasizes support for CD programs that contribute to the War on Terrorism and 
National Security. Replaced? Deputy Secretary of Defense Memorandum, 
Department of Defense Counternarcotics Policy, 31 July 2002 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

DOD Directive, Provision of DOD Sensitive Support to DOD Components and other 
Departments and Agencies of the US Government, DOD Directive S-52 10.36, 10 June 
1986 

Department of Defense Critical Infrastructure Protection Plan, 18 November 1998 

OSD Continuity of Operations Plan, DOD Directive 3020.26P, 29 January 1997 

Replaced DODD 3020.26, 26 May 1995. See also Secretary of Defense 
Memorandum, Subject: Implementation of National Security Policy Direction on 
Enduring Constitutional Government and Continuity of Government Operations 
[PDD-67], 17 February 1999 

Department of Defense Civil Disturbance Plan ("Garden Plot"), 1 February 1994 

Forces deployed to assist federal and local authorities during times of civil 
disturbance situations follow the use-of-force policy found in Appendix 1 to Annex C 
and Director of Military Support message 161639Z July 1996, Subject: Changes to 
DOD Civil Disturbance Plan. Replaced 15 February 1991 and 1 March 1984 plans. 
See NORTHCOM FUNCPLAN 2502 

Department of Defense Emergency Mobilization Plan, classified 

Department of Defense Operations Plan for Routine Explosive Ordnance Disposal 
Protective Support for the United States Secret Service and the United States 
Department of State for Very Important Persons, 27 June 1995 

Replaced DOD OPLAN, EOD Support to USSS and DoS for VIPs ("VIPCO 
OPLAN"), 1 February 1991 

Department of Defense Postal Augmentation Plan ("Graphic Hand"), November 
1993 

Replaced Plan, 25 September 1990. Supplemented by Department of the Army, 
Army Forces Command, FORSCOM Domestic Emergency Planning System (DEPS), 
Volume III, Postal Augmentation Plan, Graphic Hand, 1 October 1993 

Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS) 

(Plans 0001 through 0999) 

Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan (JSCP), FY 2002, CJCS Instruction 31 10.01 E, 1 
October 2002, Top Secret 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



The JSCP fulfills the Chairman's Title 10 requirements to "prepare strategic plans, 
including plans which conform with resource levels projected by the SecDef to be 
available during the plan effectiveness period." The JSCP initiates deliberate 
planning by assigning planning tasks to the combatant commanders for the 
development of OPLANs, CONPLANs (both with and without TPFDDs), Functional 
Plans (FUNCPLANS) and Theater Security Plans (TSPs). It provides planning 
assumptions and apportions major combat forces and resources by general type and 
kind (not by unit names) and issues planning guidance to integrate joint operation 
planning activities. 

The JSCP originally introduced the concept of adaptive planning and the premise that 
a crisis can arise under a variety of circumstances that will, in turn, elicit a variety of 
likely or possible responses. Accordingly, the JSCP assigned planners the task of 
developing several response options (RO's) keyed to a specific set of conditions (e.g., 
RO's in support of Iraq no-fly zones operations). Specific guidance to component 
commanders for development of specific response options are provided by the 
supported combatant commander. 

CJCSI3110.01D 20 July 2001 Superseded by CJCSI 31 10.01E, 1 October 2002; 
CJCSI 3110.01C 16 October 1998 Superseded by CJCSI 3110.01D, 20 September 
2001; FY 1996 (JSCP FY 96), CJCSI 3110.01B 10 October 1996 Superseded by 
CJCSI 3110.01C, 16 October 1998; CJCSI 3 110.01 A 15 November 1995 Superseded 
by CJCSI 31 10.01B, 10 October 1996; CJCSI 3110.01, 24 March 1995 Superseded 
by CJCSI 31 10.01 A, 15 November 1995; replaced JSCP with annexes (CY 1993- 
1995), MCM- 168-91, 7 October 1992 

The JSCP has 14 supplemental instructions covering functional areas for planning 
purposes. 

The numbering convention is correct. Number 01 is skipped, as is number 14. 
Number 16, "Consequence Management" has just been added. 

• 02. Intelligence: CJCSI 3 1 10.02CD, Intelligence Planning Objectives, 
Guidance, and Tasks, 2 June 2003 

o Replaced Annex A (Intelligence) to the JSCP, MCM- 111-91,18 June 
1991. 

• 03 . Logistics: CJCSI 3 1 1 0.03B, Logistics Supplement to the Joint Strategic 
Capabilities Plan, 1 December 2002 

• 04. Nuclear: CJCSI 3 1 10.04A, Nuclear Supplement to the Joint Strategic 
Capabilities Plan, 28 January 00, Top Secret 

o Replaced CJCSI 3 1 10.04, 12 February 96; replaced Annex C (Nuclear) to 
the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan CY 1993-1995, Change 5, 1 August 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

1995 (Change 4, 24 June 1994; Change 2, 31 October 1996), MCM-148- 
91, 10 September 1991 

05. Psychological Operations: CJCSI 3110.05C, Joint Psychological Operations 
Supplement to the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan, 18 July 03, and classified 
supplement (CJCSI 3110.05C-1), Secret 

06. Special Operations: CJCSI 3110.06B, Special Operations Supplement to the 
Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan, 28 May 2004, Secret 

07. Nuclear, Biological, Chemical Defense; Riot Control Agents; Herbicides; and 
Non-lethal Weapons: CJCSI 31 10.07B, Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical 
Defense: Riot Control Agent; and Herbicides, 16 February 01, Secret 

08. Geospatial Information and Services: CJCSI 31 10.08B, Geospatial 
Information and Services Supplemental Instruction to the Joint Strategic 
Capabilities Plan, FY 1998, 21 June 99 

09. Information Operations 

10. C4 Systems: CJCSI 31 10. 10C, Command, Control, Communications, and 
Computer (C4) Systems Supplement to the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan, 
FY 1998, 10 October 02, Secret 

11. Mobility: CJCSI 31 10.1 IE, Mobility Supplement to the Joint Strategic 
Capabilities Plan, 19 December 02, Secret 

12. Civil Affairs: CJCSI 31 10.12C, Civil Affairs Supplement to the Joint 
Strategic Capabilities Plan, 30 October 03, Secret 

13. Mobilization: CJCSI 3110.13B, Mobilization Guidance for the Joint 
Strategic Capabilities Plan, 14 February 03, Secret 

15. Special Technical Operations: CJCSI 3110.15B, Special Technical 
Operations Supplement to the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan, 1 April 2003, 
Top Secret 

16. Consequence Management: CJCSI 3110.16, Military Capabilities, Assets, 
and Units for Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and High Yield 
Explosive Consequence Management Operations, 10 November 2000 

Unified Command Plan (UCP), 17 April 2002, Secret/NOFORN, with Change 1, June 

2002 (merged Space Command and Strategic Command); and Change 2, 10 January 

2003 (gave new missions to Strategic Command, including global strike, integrated 
missile defense, and information operations) 

Establishes missions, responsibilities, and force structure; and delineates geographic 
area of responsibility and/or functional responsibility for combatant commanders. 
The April 2002 UCP was the most comprehensive revision of the UCP in a 
generation, establishing Northern Command, and changing the mission of Joint 
Forces Command. With UCP 02, the last remaining unassigned regions of the world 
- Russia, the Caspian Sea, Antarctica, and the countries of North America - were 
placed within combatant commanders' areas of responsibility (AORs). 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



President Harry S. Truman established the first Unified Command Plan (UCP), 
creating our regional and functional combatant commands. Among these newly 
created commands were U.S. European Command (USEUCOM), U.S. Pacific 
Command (USPACOM), U.S. Atlantic Command (USLANTCOM), and the Strategic 
Air Command (SAC). 

Replaced MCM-162-99, 12 October 99; replaced MCM 24-98, 9 February 1998; 
replaced MCM-64-92, 24 April 1992 

UCP-99, approved by the President on 29 September 1999, tasked JFCOM with the 
responsibility for "providing, within CONUS, military assistance to civil authorities 
(including consequence management operations in response to nuclear, radiological, 
chemical, or biological weapons of mass destruction incidents) . . . subject to 
Secretary of Defense approval." On 13 September 1999, the Secretary of Defense 
forwarded to the President UCP-99 with amplification, which directed CINCJFCOM 
to establish the JTF-CS to serve as the primary DOD command element for the 
planning and execution of military assistance to civil authorities for domestic CM 
operations as a result of a CBRNE situation. 

JCS OPORDER 0204-01, Kedge Hammer 04 

Philippines related 

JCS CONPLAN 0300-97, Counter-Terrorism Special Operations Support to Civil 
Agencies in the event of a domestic incident (entire title classified), 14 January 1997, 
Top Secret 

Special Category (SPECAT) plan for the use of special mission units (Joint Special 
Operations Command) in extra-legal missions to combat terrorism in the United 
States based on Top Secret JSCP tasking, managed by the J3 SOD (Special 
Operations Detachment) of the Joint Staff and coordinated with SOCOM and 
NORTHCOM. Likely updated in 2002. 

CJCS CONPLAN 0400, Counter-Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, 

September 2003, Top Secret 

Plan for special mission units (Joint Special Operations Command) to detect, disable 
and neutralize Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and their associated facilities 
under the direction of a geographic combatant commander. When implemented by 
NORTHCOM in the United States, the plan is Top Secret/Special Category 
(SPECAT) due to the extra-legal use of military forces in a law enforcement function 
and the potential political sensitivity in the execution of these tasks within the 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

NORTHCOM AOR (Canada and Mexico). The 1997 plan was not oriented on Cuba, 
a SOUTHCOM task, but the new plan is expected to include counter-proliferation 
tasks in Cuba should there be meltdown post-Fidel Castro. Replaced CONPLAN 
0400-96, 3 January 1997; which replaced USCrNCACOM CONPLAN 0400-97 

CJCS OPORD 1-98, National Airborne Operations Center (NAOC) Operations, J-3A 
00485-98, 1 March 1998, Secret 

Supplemented by ACC OPORD 84-00, USAF support of the National Airborne 
Operations Center (NAOC) ("Giant Net"), 15 September 2000, Secret 

CJCS OPORD 2-98, Survivable Mobile Command Center Operations (SMCC 
Operations), J-3A 02592-97, 1 March 1998, Secret 

Operations of the mobile command centers of Strategic Command and Northern 
Command in support of continuity of operations, continuity of government and 
nuclear weapons command and control. 

CJCS OPORDER 3-0 (03-3), Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) for the 
Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, 2003 

Addresses JCS role in support of relocation and continuity of the Department of 
Defense and support for Continuity of Government (COG) functions of the federal 
government (Power Geyser). Replaced OPORDER 03-2, 1 1 September 2002; 
replaced Continuity of Operations Plan for the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
CJCSM 3410.01, 1 March 1999, Secret; 1985, Secret. 

Joint Emergency Evacuation Plan (JEEP) 

Emergency helicopter transportation of selected personnel to pre-designated 
emergency sites in support of Continuity of Government ("Power Geyser") and 
Continuity of Operations Plans (COOPs). 

Red SIOP (RSIOP) 

Formerly Red Integrated Strategic Offensive Plan (RISOP), the JCS Russia and China 
nuclear forces planning criteria for development of U.S. nuclear war plans by 
STRATCOM. Replaced RISOP-98, April 1997; replaced RISOP-97, April 1996 

Emergency Action Procedures of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (EAP 
CJCS) 

Volume I, General, Top Secret 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Security Classification Guide, Secret 
Volume II, Nuclear Operations 

Volume III, CJCS Codebook and Authentication Systems 
Volume IV, Command Center Procedures 
Volume V, CJCS Emergency Action Messages 

Nuclear Control Orders 
Volume VI, Emergency Conferences, J-3A 00864-99, 2 August 1999 

Replaced J-3A 01500-95, 6 Sepl995, Emergency Conferences for Tactical 

Warning and Attack Assessment 
Volume VII, EAM Dissemination and NEREP Procedures, Secret, 4 April 2003 

Nuclear Execution Reporting Plan, EAP-CJCS Vol. VII, Annex-A 
Volume VIII, Adaptive Planning Procedures 

Standing Rules of Engagement for US Forces, JCSI 3 121. 01 A, 15 January 2000 

CJCS Message, Counterdrug (CD)/Counter-Narco-Terrorism (CNT) Execute Order, 

262355Z Sept 03 [26 September 2003]. 

CJCS message, Global Naval Force Policy, 1 1 1745Z Dec 98 [11 December 1998], 
Secret 

Outlines the CJCS policy for naval presence of carrier battle groups (CVBGs), 
amphibious readiness groups (ARGs)/MEU (SOC), Surface Combatants, and 
TLAMS. It provides scheduling guidance and outlines how the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff will have final approval of Naval Forces presence scheduling. 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• JCS OPLAN 0030, Counter-terrorist Operations, 15 August 1985 (Prepared by the 
Joint Special Operations Agency) 

National Security Agency (NSA) 
Continuity of Operations Plan, 29 June 1976, Secret 

Central Command (CENTCOM) 
(Plans 1000 through 1999) 

USCENTCOM Campaign Plan Operation Enduring Freedom, 2002 
USCPNCCENT OPORD 97-01, Force Protection 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Replaced CNC/C5F OPORD 1000-96, Appendix 16, Annex C, Security and 
Antiterrorism. Supplemented by CUSNC/C5F OPORD 98-01, Force Protection 

CENTCOM OPLAN 1002 

Still current as of 2001. Included a nuclear annex (OPLAN 1002(N)), circa 1994- 
1995 for theater nuclear strikes in the Persian Gulf region against Iraqi and Iranian 
targets. Replaced OPLAN 1002-90, USCENTCOM Operations to Counter an Intra- 
Regional Threat to the Arabian Peninsula, 13 July 1990; replaced OPLAN 1002-90, 
USCINCCENT OPLAN for Operation Desert Storm, 16 December 1990; replaced 
OPLAN 1002-88, Defense of the Arabian Peninsula; replaced OPLAN 1002-84, 30 
November 1984, Secret 

USCENTCOM OPLAN 1003V-03, Theater Campaign Plan (Operation Iraqi 
Freedom), 30 January 2003 

Replaced OPLAN 1003-98, 12 December 2000, Secret REL USA/GBR 
Supplemented by COMUSCENTAF OPLAN 1003-98, 2 April 2001, Secret REL 
USA/GBR 

CENTCOM CONPLAN 1010, subject unknown, July 2003 

New Strategic concept approved December 2002 

USCENTCOM CONPLAN 1015-98, Major Theater War support to OPLAN 5027 
[Korean peninsula]?, 15 March 2001, Secret REL USA/GBR 

Replaced CONPLAN 1015-95. Supplemented by COMUSCENTAF CONPLAN 
1015-98, 15 June 2001, Secret REL USA/GBR 

CENTCOM CONPLAN 1017, subject unknown, 1999 

USCENTCOM CONPLAN 1025-03, Iran?, August 2003 

New strategic concept approved January 2003. Replaced 1025-98, 1 April 2001, 
Secret; replaced USCINCCENT CONPLAN 1019-96, 14 June 1996, 
Secret/USO/WN/NC and USCINCCENT CONPLAN 1020-96. Supplemented by 
COMUSCENTAF CONPLAN 1025-98, 1 August 2001, Secret 

CENTCOM CONPLAN 1067, Biological Warfare Response? 

CENTCOM CONPLAN 1100-95, subject unknown 31 March 1992, Secret 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Still active? 
Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• CONPLAN 3-84, 8 June 1984 

• SOCEUR SUPPLAN 1001-90,9 May 1 989, Top Secret 

• CENTCOM OPLAN 1004, Major Theater War - East; replaced OPLAN 1004, 1 
March 1985, Top Secret 

• CENTCOM CONPLAN 1007-84, 1 1 February 1985 

• CENTCOM OPLAN 1008-85, 12 June 1985, Top Secret Restricted Data 

• CENTCOM OPLAN 101 1-84, 1 1 April 1985, Secret 

• CENTCOM OPORDER 1019-96, Arabian Gauntlet (Iran related?), 14 June 1996 

• USCTNCCENT CONPLAN 1 020-96, Iran related? 

• CENTCOM CONPLAN 1 02 1 -89, Soviet threat to the Persian Gulf region; replaced 
CENTCOM CONPLAN 1021-85, 3 March 1986 

Joint Forces Command (JFCOM) 

Assigned missions and authorities currently are: 

• Standing JTF Headquarters (DPG, CJCS Memo of 1 November 2002, CJCS 
Implementation Guidance, 5 March 2003 

• Joint Battle Management Command and Control (JBMC2) (UCP-02; 
Management Initiative Decision 912, 7 January 2003) 

• Joint Concept Development and Experimentation (JCDE) (CJCS Memo of 23 
April 2003) 

• Joint Force Provider (UCP 02) 

• Joint Deployment Process Owner (JDPO) (UCP 02, CJCS Directive CM-907-03) 

• Joint Lessons Learned (CJCS Tasking) 

• Interagency (IA) and Multinational (MN) Transformation 

• IA and MN Information Sharing Transformation 

• Mobilization (CJCS Memo of 23 April 03) 

• Joint National Training Capability (DPG 04-09, Management Initiative Decision 
906R, January 2003) 

• Joint Urban Operations (DepSecDef memorandum, 17 September 2002) 

(Plans 2000 through 2999) 

US JFCOM OPORD 2000-99, Basic Operations Order, 15 August 1999, Secret/NF 

Provides guidance for all USJFCOM operations. Formerly USCINCACOM OPORD 
2000-99. Formerly Annex U to USCINCACOM OPORD 2000-96, "Military Support 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Finns, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

to Civil Authorities/Military Assistance for Civil Disturbances (MSCA/MACDIS)," 
14 June 1996. 

Supplemented by 

• COMSECONDFLT OPORDER 2000. 

• COMSUBLANT/COMSUBPAC OPORD 2000, Submarine Operations, 
January 1998 (replaced OPORD 2000 and COMSUBPAC OPORD 201) 

• COMICEDEFOR OPORD 2000-94 

• COMFLTFORCOM/COMLANTFLT OPORD 2000-03 (formerly 
CINCLANTFLT OPORD 2000) 

USJFCOM FUNCPLAN 2508-98, Integrated Mobilization of CONUS Medical Assets 
and the Reception of Patients, 15 June 1998, Unclassified 

Replaced JFCOM Functional Plan 2508, Integrated CONUS Medical Operations Plan 
(ICMOP) 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

LANTCOM CONPLAN 2118, Operations Deep Sea/Sea Spray 

LANTCOM OPORDER 2134, including CINCLANT/USCINCEUR Annex Lima: 

fleet ballistic missile operations, SOSUS/special projects, and strategic command and 

control. 

LANTCOM OPORD 2135, SSBN/SSN operations, handling of EAMs for SSBNs 

LANTCOM OPORD 2138, Sensitive Reconnaissance Operations 

LANTCOM OPORD 2139, Airborne Command Post Operations 

LANTCOM OPLAN 2160, CINCLANTFLT nuclear operations and emergency 

actions 

LANTCOM OPLAN 2200, 1 October 1984, Secret. 

LANTCOM OPLAN 2204, Continuity of Operations Plan, December 1974, Secret 

NOFORN 

LANTCOM CONPLAN 2300-86, 13 January 1986, Secret 

LANTCOM OPLAN 2302, 19 Julyl976, Secret 

LANTCOM CONPLAN 2305-85, nuclear operations, 18 December 1985, Secret 

Restricted Data 

ACOM OPLAN 2307-95, 1 October 1993, Secret 

LANTCOM OPLAN 2348, 28 December 1984, Secret 

SOCLANT CONPLAN 2360-90, 20 May 1991, Secret (replaced LANTCOM 

OPLAN 2360, 39 July 1984, Secret) 

SOCLANT CONPLAN 2367-98, 22 May 1990, Secret 

LANTCOM OPORD 2370, Haiti, Non-Permissive Entry 

LANTCOM OPORD 2375, Haiti, Permissive Entry (replaced by OPORD 2380) 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Finns, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• LANTCOM OPORD 2380-95, Haiti, Permissive Entry (including Combined Joint 
Task Force 180, subject: Change One to Rules of Engagement ISO OPORD 2380-95 
(211008 September 1994)) 

• LANTCOM 2400 

• USCTNCJFCOM FUNCPLAN 2504-00, Response to CBRNE Incidents/Accidents, 1 
May 2000 (formerly Weapons of Mass Destruction & Radiological Accidents 
Response Plan) 

• USCINCACOM CONPLAN 28 1 0-96, Peace Enforcement Operations 

• USCINCACOM CONPLAN 2820-96, Conduct of Military Peacekeeping Operations 

Northern Command (NORTHCOM) 

CJCS [Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff], Standing HLS Execute Order (EXORD), 
081813Z Oct 02 (8 October 2002) 

Homeland security execute order activating NORTHCOM and providing guidance on 
Operation Noble Eagle (Mod 3, 2004). 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 0500-03, Military Assistance to Domestic Consequence 
Management Operations in Response to a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, 
Nuclear or High Yield Explosive (CBRNE) Situation or Event, March 2003, Secret 
(new OPR is NORTHCOM/J5P, replacing JCS for planning responsibility) 

CONPLAN w/TPFDD to conduct CBRNE consequence management operations in 
support of the designated lead federal agency (LFA) in the 48 contiguous states, the 
District of Columbia, Alaska, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. CONPLAN 
0500 superceded CJCS CONPLAN 0400 Annex T Appendix 2 for domestic WMD 
consequence management (CM) operations. 

Replaced JFCOM CONPLAN 0500-98, 12 August 2002; replaced JCS CONPLAN 
0500-98, 1 1 February 2002. New Strategic Concept approved, 26 April 2001 for 
2003 rewrite. Originally called Military Support to Domestic Consequence 
Management Operations in Response to a Weapon of Mass Destruction Threat or 
Incident. Replaced JFCOM CONPLAN 0500-98, 12 August 2002; and 
USCINCACOM CONPLAN 0400-97, Secret and USCINCACOM FUNCPLAN 
2504-98, Military Resources and Operations in Support of DOD or other federal 
agencies responding to a Radiological Emergency, 8 March 1999 

The Unified Command Plan 2002 (UCP 02) tasks Commander, NORTHCOM 
(effective 1 October 2002) with "providing, within the continental United States 
(CONUS) Military Assistance to Civil Authorities including consequence 
management (CM) operations, in response to a chemical, biological, radiological, 
nuclear or high-yield explosive incident." The SECDEF retains CBRNE/CM 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

authority under the office of Assistant Secretary of Defense (SO/LIC). The Deputy 
Secretary of Defense will determine if the CBRNE situation warrants special 
management procedures and channels (use of special mission units and activation of 
CONPLANs 0300/0400. 

DOD may serve as a support agency to the FBI for crisis management functions, and 
as a support agency to FEMA (Department of Homeland Security) for consequence 
management. In accordance with DOD Directive 3025.15, CONPLAN 0500, and 
upon approval by the Secretary of Defense, DOD will provide assistance to the LFA 
and/or the CONPLAN primary agencies, as appropriate. DOD assistance includes 
threat assessment; domestic emergency support team (DEST) participation and 
transportation; technical advice; operational support; support for civil disturbances; 
custody, transportation and disposal of a WMD device; and other capabilities 
including mitigation of the consequences of a release. 

Annex C, Appendix 16, "Rules for the Use of Force." There is a presumption that 
conventional military and disaster response units deployed to sites of a CBRNE 
situation will not carry arms. As authorized by SECDEF, units may deploy to sites 
with their weapons stored in an appropriate storage container to cover possible follow 
on assignments where weapons are authorized. Military commanders are responsible 
to ensure that weapons and ammunition are properly stored and physically secured at 
any incident response site. 

NORTHCOM OPLAN 2002 (Draft), Homeland Defense Plan, October 2003, Secret 

Homeland defense plan, not a civil support plan. DOD is the lead federal agency in 
the execution of missions to deter attack against, and defend the U.S. from, 
concurrent missile and air threats, as well as information operations (cyber warfare) 
threats. The plan includes coordination with civil authorities to protect critical U.S. 
infrastructures (including cyber networks) required to project and support forces 
overseas, and provides support for the U.S. from CBRNE weapons and for 
consequence management. CONPLAN 2002 will have a branch plan for Civil 
Support to include a new concept of Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA), 
humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, "all hazard" consequence management, 
and other specific missions where DOD is in support. 

OPLAN 2002 being created in an accelerated time schedule and is NORTHCOM's 
Tier #1 JSCP regional task. OPLAN 2002 is not the same as CAMPLAN 2525-02, 
which is the plan for Operation Noble Eagle. NORTHCOM is due to receive a 
National Intelligence Estimate to support OPLAN development. May incorporate 
CONPLAN 2222-98. 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 2100-98, Noncombatant Evacuation Operations (NEO), 1 

February 2002, Confidential 

Non-combatant evacuation operations in support of the Department of State. 
Formerly JFCOM CONPLAN 

NORTHCOM/EUCOM CONPLAN 2222-98, Protection of the AOR ASLOC [Area of 
Responsibility Air and Sea Lines of Communications],! March 2001, Secret/REL 

NATO 

CONPLAN to protect sea and air lines of communication to allies or warfighting 
commands from interference by any country. The CONPLAN is restricted in the 
offensive operations against Russia due to potential escalation. It is envisioned that 
this CONPLAN will not be executed in isolation — rather that some other combatant 
commander, or ally, will be engaged in a conflict requiring reinforcement/resupply 
from the U.S. through the Atlantic Ocean. Formerly EUCOM/JFCOM CONPLAN 
2222-98, will be incorporated into OPLAN 2002. 

NORTHCOM FUNCPLAN 2500-98, Military Support to the Department of State 
and Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) for Humanitarian Assistance and 
Disaster Relief Operations, 15 June 2001, Unclassified 

Plan to assist other U.S. government agencies, as well as international, host-nation 
and non-governmental organizations to support humanitarian assistance and disaster 
relief operations outside CONUS, U.S. territories, and protectorates. Formerly 
JFCOM FUNCPLAN; replaced USACOM Functional Plan 2500-96 

NORTHCOM FUNCPLAN 2501-97, Military Support to Civil Authorities (MSCA) 
in Responding to Natural or Man-made Disasters, 2 February 1998 

Plan to support the employment of DOD forces to conduct disaster relief by providing 
military support to civil authorities in support of disaster (or other event) response 
and consequence management operations. Generally, DOD participates in MSCA 
only when the response or recovery requirements are beyond the capabilities of civil 
authorities (as determined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) 
or other lead federal agency (LFA) for emergency response. The statutory basis for 
providing military support is the Stafford Act. Formerly US JFCOM FUNCPLAN; 
replaced USACOM Functional Plan 2501-97, 23 July 1997 

Incorporates and supports: 

• Headquarters, Alaskan Command, COMALCOM CONPLAN 5210, Military 
Support to Civil Authorities, 23 May 1997 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• Commander in Chief, U.S. Southern Command (USCINCSO), USCINCSO 
Functional Plan 6175-98, Domestic Support Operations, 1 July 1998 

• United States National Search and Rescue Plan - 1999 

• Army Forces Command (COMFORSCOM) FUNCPLAN 250 1 -00, Military 
Support to Civil Authorities, 1 March 2000 

NORTHCOM FUNCPLAN 2502, Civil Disturbance Plan (MACDIS, military 
resources supporting civil authorities responding to civil disturbances) ("Garden 

Plot"), August 2003. 

Planning and response to federal, state, and local governments and their law 
enforcement agencies for civil disturbances and civil disturbance operations (not 
including response to terrorist incidents) in CONUS. The President issues an 
Executive Order that orders and directs the Attorney General and the Secretary of 
Defense to take appropriate steps to disperse insurgents and restore law and order. 
The President is authorized by the Constitution and the Insurrection Act (10 U.S. 
Code 331-334) to suppress insurrections, rebellions and domestic violence under 
various conditions and circumstances. Last time executed was in Los Angeles in 
1992. 

Replaced JFCOM FUNCPLAN 2502-98, Employment of Military Resources 
Supporting Civil Authorities in Responding to Civil Disturbances (MACDIS) in 
CONUS, 25 June 2001; replaced USCINCACOM FUNCPLAN 2502-97, Civil 
Disturbance Plan ("Garden Plot,"), 23 July 1998 and USCINCLANT CJTF 140 Plan 
Garden Plot (U); prior to creation of the 2502 Function Plan, the plan was Civil 
Disturbance Plan, 11 February 1993 

Supplemented by USAF Plan 55-2, DOD Civil Disturbance Plan (Garden Plot); and 
Army FORSCOM Civil Disturbance Plan (Garden Plot) 

NORTHCOM FUNCPLAN 2503-97, Military Support to the Department of Justice 
(DOJ) and Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) during a Mass 
Immigration into the United States ("Legacy Freedom"), 30 November 1997, 
Unclassified 

Provides military support to the Department of Justice (Do J) and Immigration and 
Naturalization Service (INS) during a mass immigration into the United States, and to 
limit the flow of large numbers of people into the U.S. from areas in the Caribbean. 
Replaced Department of Defense/Department of the Army, United States Army 
Forces Command/JFCOM FUNCPLAN, Mass Immigration Emergency Plan, 20 
January 1993 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

NORTHCOM Campaign Plan 2525-02, Operation Noble Eagle (Campaign Plan for 
Homeland Security), 1 October 2002, Secret/RELCAN 

Campaign plan (CAMPLAN) for homeland security operations and for execution of 
Operation Noble Eagle in support of the war of terrorism. Mod 3 to the JCS HLS 
EXORD is most current execution document (2004). Provides a concept of operation 
for Health Service Support, assigns tasks, and provides guidance on military medical 
support to DoD forces for Homeland Security (HLS) and Civil Support (CS) 
operations in the USNORTHCOM Joint Operational Area (JOA). Formerly 
USJFCOM Draft Campaign Plan 2525-01 (Draft), Operations to Support Civil 
Authorities in Securing the Homeland, 22 October 2001. Supplemented by Joint 
Task Force-6 OPLAN 2525-01, 17 January 2002, Secret 

NORTHCOM/USJFCOM FUNCPLAN 2707-00, Military Activities in Support of 
Counter Drug Operations, 17 August 2000, Secret 

Plan to support law enforcement efforts to detect, monitor, and interdict drug 
trafficking and reduce its impact on U.S. security and regional stability. Formerly 
JFCOM FUNCPLAN, Military Operations in Support of Counter Drug Operations. 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 3500, subject unknown, January 2004 

New strategic concept approved July 2003 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 3800-00, Mobile Consolidate Command Center 
Operations, 12 April 2000 

Contingency guidance for the NORTHCOM national mobile command center 
normally housed at FE. Warren AFB, WY. Formerly USSPACECOM CONPLAN 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 3900, homeland defense, actual plan produced December 
2002 

NORTHCOM CONPLAN 6435, subject unkown 

New strategic concept approved October 2003. Plan transferred from SOUTHCOM 
onl October 2003. 

NORTHCOM Theater Engagement Plan (TEP), 1 April 2001, Secret 

Provides theater engagement guidance for Canada, Mexico and other foreign nations 
in the NORTHCOM AOR. Formerly JFCOM plan 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

NORTHCOM, Maritime Interdiction Operations (MIO) Plan, [2003?] 
North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) 

(Plans 3000 through 3399) 

Canada-United States (CANUS) Combined Defense Plan, 14 December 2001, Secret- 
Rel USA and CAN 

Bi-national Concept Plan (CONPLAN) that provides for the combined land and 
maritime defense and security of Canada and the US (CANUS) in support of CANUS 
Basic Security Document MCC 100-35. Formerly JFCOM plan, NORTHCOM is the 
responsible US unified command. 

Canada-United States (CANUS) Basic Security Document (BSD), CANUS MCC 

100/35 

The Basic Security Document is the cornerstone bi-nationally approved strategic 
planning document that provides guidance on air, land, and maritime defense of 
North America. The Canada-US Military Cooperation Committee (MCC) is 
responsible for the review and currency BSD. Changes to the BSD, NORAD 
CONPLAN 3310, and/or the Combined Defense Plan (CDP) are submitted through 
the MCC for review and approval. 

Canada-United States (CANUS) Civil Assistance Plan (CAP) 

New post-9/1 1 FUNCPLAN focused upon military assistance to civil authorities 
(MACA) 

Canada-US Contingency Plan for the Defense of the Strait of Juan de Fuca 

Canada-US Communications Plan (CANUS COMMPLAN) 

Canada-US Land Operations Plan (CANUS LANDOP), 1 September 1983, Secret 

Canada-US Maritime Operations Plan (West) (CANUS MARWESTOP), Secret 

NORAD-Revised Ground-Based Mid-Course Defense (GMD) CONOPS (Draft) 

The CONOPS is due to be completed five months following official announcement of 
Government of Canada participation in US Missile Defense system 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

NORAD CONPLAN 3310-02 (Draft), Combined US-Canada Aerospace Sovereignty 

and Aerospace Defense, awaiting SECDEF approval (2004), Secret US and Canada 
Only 

Replaces CONPLAN 3310-96, with Change 2, 24 September 1999. CONPLAN 
3310-02 was modified to parallel the CJCS Operation Noble Eagle EXORD and add 
Air Sovereignty Levels. It has been updated to address the asymmetric threat as well 
as continue to address traditional strategic aerospace threats. NORAD CONPLAN 
3310 will continue as a separate bi-national plan focused on aerospace sovereignty 
and aerospace defense (but be coordinated with air portions of Campaign Plan 2525 
and OPLAN 2002). It does not address missile defense. 

Peacetime, transition and wartime Rules of Engagement (p. C-14-6, Table 12.1) 

Supplemented by COMANR CONPLAN 3310-96 (or update) 

CDRUSELEMNORAD CONPLAN 3349-02, 15 January 1998 (with proposed Change 
1), Secret/US Only 

Draft of new plan due October 2004. Replaces CONPLAN 3349-98, 15 January 
1998. May be integrated into OPLAN 2002 in next cycle of plans. 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• NORAD/CINCAD OPLAN 3000-83, 1 July 1982, Secret 

• NORAD/CINCAD OPLAN 3003-83, 1 July 1982, Secret 

• OPORD 3025, Operation Western Focus (Army Reserve) 

• NORAD OPLAN 3150, 15 November 1979 

• NORAD OPORD 3199, Air Defense of the US 

• NORAD OPLAN 3400, space systems 

• NORAD EXORD 3700, space warning and surveillance systems involved in exercise 
Global Shield. 

European Command (EUCOM) 

(Plans 4000 through 4999) 

NUMBER BLOCK TYPE PLAN 

4000-4099 Exercises (with suffix X) 

4 1 00-4 1 99 NATO Oriented 

4200-4299 Non-NATO Oriented 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Finns, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

4300-4349 Foreign Internal Defense/Special Plans 

4350-4369 Command and Control 

4360-4399 As assigned 

USEUCOM OPORD 03-1 1, Antiterrorism, 14 November 2003 

Replaced USEUCOM OPORD 0101, with FRAGO 1, COMUSEUCOM 
Antiterrorism-Force Protection Operations Order, 8 March 2002 

COMUSNAVEUR OPORD 4000/4001, Basic Operations Order 

CINCUSNAVEUR OPORD 4001, Submarine and Anti- Submarine Exercise and 
Safety Supplement. Supplemented by COMSDCTHFLT OPORD 4000, Baltic Sea 
Operations 

EUCOM OPLAN 4112, subject unknown 

Replaced USCINCEUR OPLAN 41 12-83, Top Secret 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4122-98, Africa related?, 1 February 2000, Secret 

TPFDD conference held 2-1 1 February 2004. The plan scenario supports 88,000 US 
troops. Replaced CONPLAN 4122-96. Supplemented by COMUSAFE CONPLAN 
4122-98, 30 October 2001, Secret 

EUCOM CONPLAN 4132, subject unknown, July 2003 

TPFDD conference held 10-19 March 2003 
EUCOM CONPLAN 4220-95, subject unknown, 25 February 1993, Top Secret 
EUCOM CONPLAN 4265, subject unknown, 2004 

TPFDD conference held 8-17 September 2003 and 10-19 May 2004 

USEUCOM Plan 4269-96, Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief Operations, 

Unclassified 

COMUSAFE PLAN 4286, theater nuclear weapons related 
EUCOM CONPLAN 4305, subject unknown 
TPFDD conference held 18-27 August 2003 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

EUCOM OPLAN 4312, HQ EUCOM Continuity of Operations, Secret 

Possibly rescinded? 

EUCOM OPORD 4339-02, nuclear command and control related, 2002 

Implements the concept of operations and tasks that enable the USEUCOM ABNCP 
to accomplish the non-strategic nuclear forces (NC2) mission. The plan directs HQ 
USEUCOM to maintain a Survivable Mobile Command Center (SMCC) in order to 
support U. S. national and USEUCOM nuclear command and control requirements. It 
further provides direction and guidance to component commanders to support 
ABNCP operations by detailing base support requirements. 

COMUSAFE Plan 4405-97, USAFE Air Expeditionary Force, Secret/NF 

USAFE OPORD 4831, Exercise Deployments in the USAFE AOR, 31 January 2000 

USCINCEUR OPLAN 4999-98, Defense of Western Europe In General War 

Probably replaced OPLAN 4102 and likely rescinded itself 
Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• Commander in Chief, United States Army, Europe (CTNCUSAREUR) OPLAN 
4101? 

• EUCOM OPLAN 4 1 02, Defense of Western Europe (replaced OPLAN 4 1 02-84, 1 
March 1985, Top Secret; replaced OPLAN 4102-84, 2 July 1984, Top Secret. 
Supplemented by CTNCUSAREUR OPLAN 4102) 

• USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4110? 

• EUCOM OPLAN 4209-84, Secret Restricted Data 

• EUCOM CONPLAN 42 11-90, 23 May 1991, Top Secret 

• USCINCEUR CONPLAN 42 1 7 

• USCTNCEUR CONPLAN 422 1 

• USCPNCEUR CONPLAN 4222 

• USCTNCEUR OPORD 4243, Peace Implementation in the Former Yugoslavia (last 
modification), 24 January 1996, Secret (replaced CINCEUR OPLAN 4243, Balkan 
Endeavor, 2 December 1995) 

• USCTNCEUR OPORD 4246, Joint Guard (former Yugoslavia), 20 December 1 996, 
Secret 

• CTNCUSAREUR OPORD 4247, Joint Guard (former Yugoslavia), 3 1 January 1 997, 
Secret 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

SOCEUR OMNIBUS 4260-90, 15 November 1990, Secret/LIMDIS 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4285 

EUCOM CONPLAN 4292-90, 20 February 1990, Secret 

USCINCEUR OPLAN 4295 

EUCOM OPLAN 4300, 10 March 1981, Secret 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4302 

CINCUSAREUR OPLAN 4310 

EUCOM CONPLAN 4311-95, 28 May 1993, Secret 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4348 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4349 

CINCUSAREUR OPLAN 4360 

USCINCEUR CONPLAN 4367 

USCINCEUR OPLAN 4375 

USCINCEUR Functional Plan 441 1-97, Transfer of NSJTF Responsibilities to 

USAREURUse, 23 September 1997 

Pacific Command (PACOM) 

(Plans 5000 through 5999) 

PACOM Homeland Defense/Civil Support Contingency Plan (CONPLAN) 

Covers intelligence sharing, anti-terrorism/force protection (AT/FP), critical 
infrastructure protection (CIP), CBRNE and natural disasters as well as other 
requested support to the civilian sector, providing a comprehensive program for 
Hawaii, Guam, and other US territories in the AOR. 

"Project 19" 

US-Taiwan CONPLAN, with air, naval, ground/amphibious, and missile 
segments 

CINCPACFLT OPORDER 201, basic operations order 

Includes Appendix 27, Annex C, Anti-Terrorist; Appendix 28, Annex C, Anti-Piracy 
Defense; Annex H, October 1996 (replaced Annex H, June 1994). Supplemented by 
COMSEVENTHFLT OPORDER 20 1 ; C3F OPORD 20 1 , Antiterrorism/Force 
Protection; CTG 73.7.3 OPORDER 201, Afloat Pre-positioning Force (APF) ships 
stationed at Diego Garcia 

PACOM OPORD 3020-03, Critical Infrastructure Protection (Draft), PACOM J34, 
2004 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 



PACOM Theater Infrastructure Assurance Plan. The first Critical Infrastructure 
Program (CIP) Appendix was submitted to the Joint Staff on 30 April 2003. The 
Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Operation Order (OPORD) was in final 
staffing in 2003. 

PACOM CONPLAN/OPORDER 5002, Hawaii related?, October 2003 

Replaced OPLAN 5002, 28 March 1984, Secret 

PACOM CONPLAN 5005, subject unknown, 2004 

PACOM CONPLAN 5026, Preemptive? attacks on North Korea, August 2003 

Involves pre-planned strikes against North Korean targets, as well as US-Japan 
planning relating to the Korean peninsula. New strategic concept approved January 
2003. TPFDD conferences held 21 April-2 May 2003 and 13-30 October 2003 

USPACOM OPLAN 5027-04, Major Combat Operations on the Korean Peninsula, 

2004, Secret/NF 

TPFDD conference held 2-13 June 2003. Replaced 5027-02, 18 January 2001; 
replaced OPLAN 5027-98; replaced OPLAN 5027-95 ("Orange Plan"), Major 
Theater War- West, 15 July 1995; replaced OPLAN 5027-83, 1 March 1984, Secret. 
Supplemented by COMPACAF OPLAN 5027-98, 1 August 2001, Secret; and EUSA 
OPLAN 5027 

USPACOM CONPLAN 5028-98, support to OPLAN 1003?, 28 November 2000, 
Secret/NF 

Planning suspended in 2004 with completion of major combat operations in 
Operation Iraqi Freedom. Replaced CONPLAN 5028-96 

PACOMUS-ROK Combined Forces Command CONPLAN 5029, Reaction to the 
collapse of North Korea, 2004 

PACOM CONPLAN 5030-03, Full spectrum pre-conflict operations against North 
Korea, June 2003 



PACOM CONPLAN 5040-03?, subject unknown 
Replaced CONPLAN 5040-86 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

USCINCPAC OPORD 5050-99, force protection and THREATCON actions 

TAB A of Appendix 2 of Annex M, deployed unit measures in force protection. 
Supplemented by USFK OPORDER 5050-02 

PACOM CONPLAN 5055, defense of Japan?, 2004 

Includes air/missile and sea control (dependent on Japanese Self Defense Force 
participation) 

PACOM FUNCPLAN 5060, Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations, February 2003 

Replaced PLAN 5060-86 

USCPNCPAC CONPLAN 5070-96, Peacekeeping, Peace Enforcement, Foreign 
Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief, Domestic Support Operations, and Other 
Small Scale Contingencies, April 2003, Secret 

USPACOM CONPLAN 5077-02, July 2003 

Conducting air, naval, ground/amphibious, and missile operations and related 
excursions of the CONPLAN 5077. New strategic concept approved December 
2002. TFPDD forces conference held 17-28 February 2003 and 14-30 July 2003. 
Replaced OPLAN 5077-98, 19 August 2001 (Change 1), Secret; replaced CONPLAN 
5077-84. Supplemented by COMPACAF OPLAN 5077-98, 1 September 2001, 
Secret 

PACOM CONPLAN 5083, subject unknown, 2004 

PACOM CONPLAN 5100, subject unknown, March 2003 

Replaced CONPLAN 5100-86 

USCINCPAC OPLAN 5123-02, subject unknown, 31 March 2003, Secret/NF/WN 

PACAF CONPLAN 5150-96, Contingency Operations in the US Pacific Command 
Area of Responsibility, Confidential 

PACOM CONPLAN 5200, subject unknown, May 2003 

PACOM CONPLAN 5304, subject unknown, September 2003 

PACOM CONPLAN 5305, subject unknown, 2004 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

USPACOM Theater Security Cooperation (TSC) Plan 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

PACOM OPLAN 5000-84, 16 September 1983, Secret 

PACOM OPLAN 5001-85, 15 February 1984, Secret Restricted Data 

PACOM CONPLAN 5020-83 

PACOM OPLAN 5051, Japan Draft Defense Plan, Secret 

PACOM CONPLAN 5052 

PACOM 5053? 

PACOM PLAN 5065-85 

PACOM PLAN 5068-84, USCINCPAC/FAA Western Region Relationship 

PACOM 5076 

PACOM 5095-85 

PACOM OPLAN 5104, November 1973, Secret NOFORN, rescinded and replaced 

by Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) 
PACOM CONPLAN 5107, Lava Flow Control to Protect the City of Hilo, Hawaii 
PACOM OPLAN 5111, PACOM Redoubt 

PACOM OPORD 51 17-85, Pacific Command Airborne Command Post 
PACOM PLAN 5122-85 

PACOM OPLAN 5125, Augmentation/Support of Other Unified Commands 
PACOM CONPLAN 5137-83, Recovery and Repatriation of Human Remains from 

Crash Sites of US Aircraft in the Lao People's Democratic Republic 
PACOM CONPLAN 5138-84 
PACOM PLAN 5139, Recovery and Repatriation of Human Remains from Crash 

Sites of US Aircraft in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam 
PACOM PLAN 5140-84, Augmentation of the Joint Casualty Resolution Center 
PACOM CONPLAN 5300-83, Confidential Restricted Data 

Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) 

(Plans 6000 through 6999) 

SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6103-90, subject unknown, 4 August 1989, Secret 

New strategic concept approved June 2003. 

SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6115, defense of the Southern US and Caribbean? 

New strategic concept approved March 2003. Incorporates elements of CONPLANs 
2002 and 5002 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6120, subject unknown, January 2004 
SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6150, subject unknown, February 2004 

New strategic concept approved February 2003. Replaced OPLAN 6150-82 
USCINCSO Functional Plan 6175-98, Domestic Support Operations, 1 July 1998 
SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6222, subject unknown 

New strategic concept approved December 2003 

SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6225, subject unknown, January 2004 

SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6300-97, subject unknown, 1 October 1994, Secret 

New strategic concept approved May 2003. Replaced CONPLAN 6300-90, 1 August 
1989 

USSOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6400, subject unknown, August 2003, Secret 

Replaced CONPLAN 6400-98, 15 February 1998 (with Change 2, 15 October 1999), 
Secret; replaced CONPLAN 6400-86 

USSOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6601-98, subject unknown, 1 October 1999 (with Change 
1, 8 December 2000), Secret 

New strategic concept approved June 2003. Replaced CONPLAN 6601-95, 17 May 
1993 

USSOUTHCOM OPORD 6800, Sensitive Recon Operations 

Counterdrug Campaign Plan, 13 November 1992, Secret 

USCINCSO Theater Engagement Plan FY02-04, 18 June 2001 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6100-95, Panama related?, 12 March 1993 (replaced 
USCINSO/CDR 193rd Infantry Brigade/COMUSNAVSO/ COMES AFO CONPLAN 
6100-85; replaced REDCOM CONPLAN 6100-83, 1 January 1982, Secret) 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6 1 04-82, USSOUTHCOM Security Development Plan 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6 1 06-84 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6155-84 

• SOUTHCOM OPLAN 6157-86, 9 April 1985, Top Secret Restricted Data 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6159-86 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6 1 60-83 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6 1 70-83 

• SOUTHCOM OPLAN 6500, USCINSO/CDR 1 93 rd Infantry Brigade/ 
COMUSNAVSO/COMUSAFO 

• SOUTHCOM OPLAN 6602-85 

• SOUTHCOM CONPLAN 6700-79, USCINSO/CDRPNG 

Special Operations Command (SOCOM) 

(Plans 7000 through 7999) 

AFSOC [Air Force Special Operations Command], OMNIBUS 7800-93, 1 April 1993 

Former Readiness Command (REDCOM) 
Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• REDCOM OPLAN 6501-81, 1 January 1982, Secret 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7034-85, Deployment of Air Defense and Air Superiority Air- 
to-Air Assets, 1 October 1984, Secret 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7040, 17 November 1980, Secret 

• CDRFORSCOM/USCINCARRED CONPLAN 7045-86, Military Support of Civil 
Defense (MSCD), 1 March 1986, Unclassified without Annexes (Replaced 
CONPLAN 7045, 7 October 1980, with Change 1,16 March 1981, Secret; replaced 
CONPLAN 7045, 22 February 1979, Secret) 

• Sixth United States Army CONPLAN 7045 , 24 July 1 979 

• REDCOM OPLAN 7048-85, 20 October 1985, Secret Restricted Data 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7077, 30 April 1979, Secret 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7085-83, Continuity of Operations, 25 January 1983, Secret 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7 1 00-84, 1 6 July 1984, Top Secret 

• REDCOM OPLAN 7120-85, 28 February 1985, Secret (replaced OPLAN 7120, 1 
February 1983) 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7200-84, 1 May 1984, Secret 

• REDCOM CONPLAN 7300, 21 June 1982, Secret 

Strategic Command (STRATCOM) 

Assigned missions and authorities currently are: 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• Global Strike (Change 2 to UCP 02, TOR for Change 2) 

• Global Missile Defense (Change 2 to UCP 02, TOR for Change 2) 

• Global Information Operations (Change 2 to UCP 02, TOR for Change 2) 

• Global C2 Services (Change 2 to UCP 02, TOR for Change 2) 

• Global ISR (Change 2 to UCP 02, TOR for UCP Change 2) 

(Plans 8000 through 8999) 

USSTRATCOM Continuity of Operations Plan (COPSTRAT) 

Replaced SAC Continuity of Operations Plan (COPS AC), 1 January 1976, Secret 

USSTRATCOM CONPLAN 8022, Global Strike, November 2003 

Strategic concept approved May 2003 

USSTRATCOM OPLAN 8044, National Strategic Response Plans?, formerly Single 
Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP), April 2003, Top Secret/RD/FRD/NF 

The term SIOP was replaced with Operations Plan 8044 Revision 03, IAW JCS 
Chairman's Memorandum (CM-757-03), 8 February 2003. The SIOP is no longer a 
stand-alone document prepared by the (former) Joint Strategic Target Planning Staff; 
rather, it is a numbered OPLAN prepared by the STRATCOM Plans and Policy 
Directorate, J-5, with a target list integrated into the Joint Strategic Capabilities Plan 
(JSCP). OPLAN 8044 requirements include STRATCOM' s warfighting capability to 
plan and execute the Single Integrated Operational Plan (SIOP) and to provide 
regional combatant commanders with theater nuclear support planning and WMD 
analysis. 

New USSTRATCOM Strategic Concept for OPLAN 8044-02 in coordination (2004); 
new plan concept refined 2-6 December 2002. Maintenance conference held 10-21 
November 2003. Replaced USSTRATCOM OPLAN 8044-98, 25 January 2001, 
Secret/FRD. Supplemented by COMACC Support Plan (SPlan) 8044-98, Change 2, 
1 March 03, Secret/FRD; and COMAMC OPLAN 8044-95 

Annexes and amplifying plans 

• Annex B, Nuclear Weapons Intelligence Support Plan (NISP) (formerly 
Appendix V to Annex B to the NISP (SIOP Route Book), 1990 

• Annex C, National Strategic Target List (NSTL) 

• NUWEP Reconnaissance List 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

• NUWEP Reconnaissance Planning Manual 

• NUWEP Reconnaissance Data Manual 

• SIOP Reconnaissance Plan (replaced Airborne SIOP Reconnaissance Plan 95 
(ASRP-95)) 

Obsolete SIOPs 

SIOP 01, 2000 

SIOP 00, 1999 

SIOP 99, 1998 

SIOP 98, 1 October 1997 

SIOP 97, 1996 

SIOP 96, 1995 

SIOP 95 Revision B 

SIOP 95, 1994 

SIOP 94, 1993 

SIOP 93, 1992 

SIOP 6H, 1991 

SIOP 6G, 1990 

SIOP 6F, 1989 

SIOP 6E, 1988 

USSTRATCOM CONPLAN 8050, ballistic missile defense (Draft), 2004, 
Secret/NOFORN 

Provides for the employment of Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) forces to protect the 
US homeland. Supplemented by NORTHCOM Supporting Plan (BMD) to U.S. 
Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM) CONPLAN 8050, 6 April 2004 

Emergency Action Procedures Strategic Command (EAP-STRAT) 

Volume 7, Strategic Communications Procedures, Secret 
Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• STRATCOM OPLAN 109-82, Headquarters Emergency Relocation Team 
(HERT) Communications 

Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) 

(Plans 9000 through 9599) 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

COMSC OPORD 9200, Current Operations 

COMSC Logistic Support and Mobilization Plan (LSMP) 

COMSC Continuity of Operations Plan (COOPLAN) 

Former Military Airlift Command (MAC) 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

MAC SPLAN 9429, 1 May 1983, Unclassified 

MAC OPLAN 9438, 1 July 1985, Unclassified 

MAC OPLAN 9444, 15 August 1983, Secret 

MAC OPLAN 9447, 15 April 1981, Unclassified 

MAC OPLAN 9450, July 1984, Unclassified 

MAC SPLAN 9462, 2 May 1983, Unclassified 

MAC OPLAN 9485, 1 July 1983, Secret 

MAC OPLAN 9492, 2 January 1976, Secret 

MAC OPLAN 9498, 1 April 1985, Top Secret 

MAC OPLAN 9499, 1 March 1983, Secret 

MAC OPLAN 9505, 1 September 1984, Confidential 

MAC OPLAN 9543, 7 April 1984, Unclassified 

MAC CONPLAN 9553, 15 June 1984, Confidential 

MAC CONPLAN 9554, 10 December 1975, Unclassified 

MAC CONPLAN 9577, 20 December 1976, Unclassified 

MAC OPLAN 9447, 15 April 1981, Unclassified 

Alaskan Command/ JTF Alaska 

Headquarters, Alaskan Command, COMALCOM CONPLAN 5210, Alaskan Civil 
Emergencies/Natural Disasters (Military Support to Civil Authorities), 23 May 1997 

JTF Alaskan Road OPORDER 5250-03, Operation Alaskan Road, 1 February 2003 

JTF Alaska OPLAN 9600, Alaska General Defense Plan 

Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• JTF Alaska OPLAN 9639-1, Civil Emergency Relief Operations, 1 September 1981 
US Coast Guard 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

The US Coast Guard Maritime Strategy for Homeland Security, December 2002 

Coast Guard Logistics and Support Capabilities Plan 

Maritime Counter-Terrorism Contingency Plan 

OPLAN 5000 Series, updated in 1991 

COML ANT AREA OPLAN 9700-95, basic operating order? 

Appendix 29, Terrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction Response Operations 
appendix 

COMDT COGARD Washington DC 171300Z April 00 [17 April 20000] /ALCOAST 
177/00, G-O/M, Interim Guidance Regarding Coast Guard Response to Weapons of 
Mass Destruction (WMD) Incidents 

COMDT COGARD Washington DC 041520Z December 01 [4 December 2001] 
/ALCOAST 555/01, G-O/M, FOSC [Federal On-Scene Coordinator] Response to 
Incidents Involving Anthrax or Other Disease-Causing Agents 

Commander Coast Guard District Seven (CCGD7) OPLAN 9707-99, Cuban Mass 
Emigration Emergency Plan 

Replaces or supplements US Coast Guard OPLAN 9707-96, 28 February 1996 

"A long history of foreign nationals migrating to the United States exists. The current 
political and economic instability in Cuba creates a great potential for a sudden mass 
migration attempt to the United States or its territories. An additional incentive to 
migrate is the large population of Cuban exiles, friends and relatives living in the 
U.S., particularly South Florida. Large-scale illegal immigration to the United States 
from Caribbean nations will be primarily by vessels seeking the nearest landfall in 
southern Florida. In the early stages of a mass migration attempt, the primary 
responding agency, INS, may not have the resources necessary in the AOR to carry 
out their duties. Coast Guard Commands will likely be expected to fill the gap by 
providing facilities, security, food, etc., until INS components are stood up." 

Commander Coast Guard District One (CCGDONE) OPLAN 9710-95, subject unknown 

Commander Coast Guard District Five (CCGDFIVE) OPLAN 9750-95, subject 
unknown (also called the DRG plan). 

Appendix 21 to Annex C, 1 June 1995 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

COTP Wilmington OPLAN 9754-03, subject unknown 

Enclosure 5 to TAB D to Appendix 21 to Annex C 

Commander Coast Guard District Seven (CCGD7) OPLAN 9770-95, subject unknown 

"Coast Guard District Commander and Captains of the Port have broad authority in 
situations which may affect the safety and security of ports and waterways. The 
Coast Guard may be called upon to assist Federal, state or local agencies under 
existing agreements or under 14 USC 141 . The Coast Guard must be prepared to act 
in traditional maritime law enforcement incidents that may not initially be recognized 
as terrorist incidents; the Coast Guard will support and assist other agencies in 
terrorism response." (Appendix 29, Change 3) 

PACAREA OPLAN 9800 series, basic operations order? 

Thirteenth Coast Guard District OPLAN 9830-00, subject unknown 

OPLAN 9840, updated in 1991 

Provides guidance for activating Commander Coast Guard Forces Honolulu 

Coast Guard HQ OPLAN 9900 Series 

The 9900 OPLAN was born out of the need for the Commandant and the Secretary's 
desires to have a better idea as to how the Coast Guard will respond to multiple 
concurrent contingencies. The 9900 is a Commandant plan that is 
strategic/operational in nature, as opposed to tactical. 

Air Force Plans 

USAF War and Mobilization Plan, April 1997 

The WMP is the Air Force Supporting plan to the JSCP, and the source for Air Force 
planning Factors used in JOPES planning. It provides general war-planning 
guidance, policies, and factors used to develop inputs to specific plans. The WMP 
provides the Air Staff and Air Force commanders current policies, planning factors, 
and forces for conducting and supporting wartime operations. It encompasses all 
basic functions necessary to match facilities, personnel, and materiel resources with 
planned wartime activity. The WMP has five separate volumes, is published 
electronically and is not distributed below the MAJCOM level. 



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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Volume I, Basic Wartime Planning Guidance 
Annex Z: Deception 

Volume II 

Volume III, Combat and Support Forces 

WMP-3, Part 1 apportions combat forces by unit to the various Combatant 
Commanders for use in developing deliberate plans tasked by the JSCP. 

Volume IV (WMP-4), Wartime Aircraft Activity 

Wartime Aircraft Activity Report (WAAR) extracts of the Wartime Aircraft 
Activity (WAA) that lists the aircraft activities of approved war plans for a 
specified airfield or assault strip 

Continental United States Airborne Reconnaissance for Damage Assessment Plan 
(CARD A) 

HQ, Department of the Air Force, Continuity of Operations Plan (HQ USAF COOP), 1 
September 1999 

Formerly Continuity of Operations Plan, Department of the Air Force (COPDAF), A- 
1-79, October 1979. 

HQ USAF, Joint Emergency Evacuation Plan (JEEP) 55-4, 1 August 1996 

Operations in support of Continuity of Government ("Power Geyser"). Formerly 
USAF OPLAN 9-7; replaced JEEP, November 1971 

HQ USAF, Joint Air Transportation Service (JATS), 17 November 1987 

The Joint Air Transportation Service is used for transporting key individuals of the 
Government and those vital documents essential for day-to-day operations that cannot 
be transmitted by other means. The plan was developed primarily as an emergency air 
transportation system for movements from regrouping points and assembly areas and 
between emergency relocation and/or alternate headquarters sites during conditions 
that require operations from dispersed emergency relocation and/or alternate 
headquarters sites. Replaced USAF OPLAN 4-73, November 1973 

HQ USAF, USAF Counter-Proliferation Master Plan, December 1997 (AF/XON), 
Secret 

Air Combat Command, OMNIBUS Plan, 2004 

ACC Supporting Plan to all Combatant Commander Plans. Replaced OMNIBUS 
Plan 96, 1 October 1996, Secret/USO 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

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National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Air Combat Command, ACC Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP-ACC), 2004, 
Secret 

Replaced COOP, 1 December 2001 

Air Mobility Command, AMC OPLAN 36-03, Employment of the Modular Airborne 
Fire Fighting System (MAFFS) ("Phoenix Forest"), 1 July 2003 (draft) 

Supersedes ACC OPORD 36-95, 25 October 1995, and earlier AMC OPORDERs 
(e.g., 36-01, Employment of Air Force Forces in Support of US Forest Service 
(Phoenix Forest)) 

AFRC CONPLAN 96-1, Military Support to Civil Authorities 

509 th Bomber Wing OPLAN 508, Aircraft Protection Evacuation and Safe Heaven 

509 th Bomber Wing OPLAN 510, Preventing and Resisting Aircraft Piracy, Hijacking 

Army Plans 

Army Campaign Plan, 12 April 2004 

Army Mobilization Plan 

Army Strategic Campaign Plan for the Global War on Terrorism (ASCP-GWOT), 

Secret, January 2002 

Department of the Army, Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Post Conflict / 
Mobilization Personnel Operations 

U.S. Army Soldier and Biological Chemical Command (SBCCOM) Domestic 
Preparedness Chemical Team, Chemical Weapons Improved Response Program 
(CWIRP), Playbook, Guidelines for Responding to and Managing a Chemical 
Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorist Event, November 2000 

Department of the Army, Condition Bravo Continuity of Operations Plan (F£Q DA 
Condition Bravo COOP), Confidential 

Navy Plans 

Navy Capabilities and Mobilization Plan (NCMP) 

Annex K: Deception 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Navy Support and Mobilization Plan (NMSP) 

Department of the Navy, Continuity of Operations Plan (NAVCOOP), SECNAVINST 

S3030.4 

Marine Corps Plans 

Commandant's Planning Guidance (CPG) 

Formerly the Marine Corps Campaign Plan (MCCP). The CPG, in broad terms, 
orients all Marines to the role of the Marine Corps and lays the foundation for other 
plans, studies, and publications. 

Marine Corps Long Range Plan (MLRP) 

The MLRP defines the goals of the Marine Corps of the future. It covers a projection 
of the world 10 to 20 years in the future. The goals developed in the MLRP help to 
shape the Marine Corps Master Plan. 

Marine Corps Campaign Plan 

Marine Corps Capabilities Plan (MCP) 

The MCP is a planner's guide to the organization, deployment and employment of 
Marine Corps forces. It is written for planners within the Marine Corps, as well as for 
planners on joint staffs. 

Volume I, June 1992 

Volume II 

Classified Supplement, Secret 

Marine Corps Master Plan, 1994-2004 

Formerly the Marine Air-Ground Task Force (MAGTF) Master Plan 

Mobilization Activation Integration Deactivation Plan (MAID-P), MCO P3000.19, 
March 2004 

Replaced Marine Corps Mobilization Management Plan (MPLAN), 17 February 1999 
with Ch. 1, and earlier Marine Corps Mobilization Plan 

Volume I 

© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org 



National Security Contingency Plans of the U.S. Government 

(Supplement to Code Names: Deciphering U.S. Military Plans, Programs, and Operations in the 9/11 World) 

Volume II 
Volume III, Secret 

Supporting Establishment Master Plan (SEMP) 

Commandant of the Marine Corps (CMC) Message, "Intel Support to AT-FP in U.S.," 
DTG091831Z October 01 [9 October 2001] 

NATO Plans 

SACEUR SUPPLAN 10001 A, Nuclear Operations Plan (NOP) 

Replaced 26 April 1983, COSMIC Top Secret 
SACEUR SUPPLAN 1000 ID, NATO Europe Integrated Air Defence, 1 April 1992 
Obsolete or rescinded plans 

• SACEUR OPLAN 10002, Jump Fast, Secret 

• SACEUR OPLAN 10405, Joint Endeavour, 12 December 1995, NATO Confidential 
(On 15 December 1995, the North Atlantic Council (NAC) approved SHAPE 
OPLAN 10405 and OPORD.) 

• SACEUR OPLAN 1 0406, SACEUR Operation Plan for the Stabilization of the Peace 
in Bosnia and Herzegovina (B-H) (Joint Guard), 16 December 1996, NATO 
Confidential 

• SACEUR OPLAN 1 0407, Joint Forge, 1 7 June 1 998 

• SACEUR Contingency Oplan 1 04 1 0, Joint XXX, 8 September 1 998 

• SACEUR OPLAN 1 0602, Eagle Eye, 20 October 1 998 

• SFOR OPLAN 3 1406, Constant Guard, 17 December 1996, NATO Confidential 

• COMSFOR OPLAN 31407 

• CINCSOUTH OPLAN 40101, Deny Flight, change four, 3 May 1993, Secret 

• SACEUR OPLAN 40 1 04, Determined Effort, 2 1 July 1 995 (AFSOUTH OPLAN 
40104 provided for the extraction of UNPROFOR under hostile conditions. At the 
direction of USAREUR, SETAF developed OPLAN Daring Lion. In June 1993, 
SETAF participated in Mountain Shield at the Grafenwoehr Training Area to develop 
and validate OPLAN Daring Lion. In anticipation of conducting the UNPROFOR 
extraction, EUCOM issued a warning order to SETAF for OPLAN Daring Lion and 
CINCSOUTH released OPLAN 40104. As the Bosnia Peace Plan and the 5 October 
1995 cease-fire held, NATO decided not to use OPLAN Daring Lion) 



© William M. Arkin, 1 January 2005 (version 1) 

www.codenames.org